Curiosity and the CAN-BAN Connection

“I’ve never met an interesting person who is not also an interested person.”  Curiosity and inquisitiveness are virtues.

- Elizabeth Gilbert (on the podcast On Being with Krista Tippett)

It is unusual to hear a teacher say that they are sad that they are running out of instructional days with their students near the end of the year, but I honestly wish we had a little bit more time. Don’t get me wrong: just like most teachers, I am absolutely exhausted, the full moon last week seemed to mysteriously make even the best students act out with unexpected behaviours, and I would rather be enjoying time on my deck in the sunshine, kayaking, or travelling rather than be cooped up in a classroom. That being said, because we are doing some AMAZING learning and collaborating, I am almost disappointed to see the end of June arrive.

Since launching our inquiry into plastic pollution in the ocean and its effect on marine animals (and the world), my students and I have really taken our learning to another level. Finding a topic that they were genuinely curious about got them really fired up and excited. The activities and collaboration that we have been participating in during the last couple weeks have added fuel to the flame. Very little of it would have been possible without the use of technology. We have been exploring young innovators like Boyan Slat from the Netherlands, who has come up with a unique way to start reclaiming plastic pollution from large, ocean garbage patches. We were extremely lucky to meet with the Florida Oceanographic Society for an excellent Skype in the Classroom program about Sea Turtle conservation. We have been brainstorming ideas for how we can promote more awareness of plastic recycling in our community. But the very best part of our learning? Our collaboration with new friends from another part of the world!

A mutual friend from the Netherlands suggested that I might find a good collaboration partner in Emil Waldhauser. Emil is a creative and talented teacher from the Czech Republic, who is currently working at the Australian International School in Dhaka, Bangladesh. This was such a timely connection, as, in our class, we had recently been looking at articles from the digital “Planet or Plastic” June edition of National Geographic, and a photo that we were particularly curious about was one from Dhaka. Emil was immediately onboard with the collaboration idea, and quickly set up some SMART Amp workspaces for us to use as an asynchronous collaboration forum - a great way of making things work despite the fact that a 13 hour time difference meant we would never be able to have our students meet in real time.  In the workspaces they have posted photos of and Google Maps links to nearby neighbourhood scenes, waterways, and plastic pollution on the beach. They even shared a terrific video about pasta straws that had my students wanting to learn more! We have been doing our best to post links in the collaborative workspaces about our city, river, garbage pick-up and recycling system, and other information that we have been learning. We shared a link to the Flipgrid videos we created to share our questions and wonders about Dhaka and plastic pollution in Bangladesh, and are waiting for our partners to comment back.  It has been extremely motivating for my students (and I think for Emil’s as well) to have an authentic peer audience for their work, and to be feeling like we are making friends in another country, while representing our own.

One thing that has really stood out to me about this collaboration is the extreme curiosity that my students have been displaying about learning more about this issue and the other countries we have been investigating as a result of our learning. While our Dutch friends were unable to fit us into their busy year-end schedule to collaborate, we still made a fun Adobe Spark video to share with them, and the process of researching and then creating it was a wonderful inquiry and learning experience. We learned some words in Dutch, and also got to have a little fun and show off our great Canadian sense of humour! ;-)

The CAN-BAN (Canada-Bangladesh) connection, however, has been the most powerful by far! Our countries and cultures are very different, and yet, we still have so many similarities. We have had some really terrific discussions in class about how the way we do things in Canada are not necessarily “right” - just normal for us, but that there are multiple ways of doing things “right” in the world. “Our” way is just one of many. We can learn a lot from how others do things. They can learn from us. We can be courageous, curious and caring. We can ask questions in respectful ways to find out more, like starting our sentences with, “I am interested to learn more about…” or “I am curious about…” or “I noticed this. Can you tell me your thoughts about it?”. We are also learning a lot about ourselves in the process, thinking about the systems and structures in place in Canada that make our country a wonderful place to live in, but that we often take for granted. This is powerful learning! 

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I have very few instructional days left with my students. We are currently trying to work on a culminating project where we make sea creature muppet-style puppets similar to these (but made from craft foam) that we’ll use to make green-screened PSA-style videos about the plastic pollution problem. We want to write letters to different levels of government and local restaurants to encourage them to reduce the amount of single-use plastic drinking straws we are using. We will make it a priority to keep sharing with our friends in Bangladesh about what we are learning and doing until they are finished their school year in mid-June.  Will we get it all done? I don’t know - and I’m not worried. The fact that my students are becoming more interesting people because they are interested and curious is more than enough for me! Better humans for the win!

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