Mindfulness

What If You Just Said, "Yes"?

2017 was the first time that I picked a word to guide me for the year ahead. I liked the idea of the simplicity of that process - rather than a whole list of resolutions, streamlining things into one word of intention that would keep me focussed and moving forward.  I won’t share publicly on the blog the word I chose last year, but I WILL say that the Universe had a whole different definition of it than what I had intended in my own mind - and not at all in a way that worked with my plans and dreams for 2017. Things definitely did not turn out the way I had hoped with that one carefully chosen word. As a result, I was a little nervous to choose a word for 2018, fearing that I might face a similar situation with my new selection.

My friend, HyperDoc guru and amazing educator Lisa Highfill, tagged me in a post about a special “One Little Word” HyperDoc created by the equally outstanding educator, Sarah Landis.  It was beautiful and inspiring enough to convince me to revisit the value of this process and practice, to try it out with my students, and to choose another word myself.  I have embedded the HyperDoc below, but you can also access it at: http://bit.ly/onewordhd  As always with HyperDocs, please maintain credit to the original author in your copies or iterations.

While browsing my Twitter feed, I noticed others posting similar One Word activities, and sharing their own words for 2018, using the hashtag #oneword2018.  I was inspired by the great posts, the quality word choices, and the ideas for extending this activity.  There were beautiful graphic designs, amazing decorated doors, stellar sketchnotes, and much more to peruse. So much One Word goodness was being posted!  Another terrific One Word HyperDoc was shared by Meredith Akers on her website.  I definitely recommend you check it out as well. It is similar in idea to Sarah’s HyperDoc, but has a slightly different format for sharing out each student’s word. You can choose what might work best for your class - or possibly a mash-up of both! You can find Meredith’s activity details by clicking here.

Choosing a word does not have to be something that you do just at the beginning of the year.  I can see this being a powerful practice at the start of each month, each term or semester, or even each season of the year.  It might be something you do each year on your birthday, or at other pivotal times where you would like to refocus yourself.  It is never a bad time to stop, reflect, and move forward with intention. The word you choose is a great touchstone to come back to as you ponder next steps and consider how it has influenced the time in between choosing it and where you are now.  In British Columbia, where I live, our students are required to self-assess on a number of important core competencies.  The One Word activity could definitely tie very nicely into these reflections and assessments.

Maybe choosing a word is not your thing, but you would still like to have your students thinking about the year ahead and setting goals and intentions.  You might be interested in this additional activity that talented Texas educator Kasey Bell posted on her blog about creating digital vision boards.  I love this idea so much that I think my class will be doing it in addition to the One Word exercises!  You can find instructions and inspiration for Kasey’s vision board activity by clicking here.

I kept resisting picking my own word for 2018, but there WAS a word that kept showing up for me that was really resonating.  That word was, “Yes.”  It showed up when I had to decide whether to take a friend up on her incredible offer of a special, last minute vacation getaway.  It appeared in some beautiful meditations that I practiced from incredible teacher and author Tara Brach.  I kept finding it in articles and posts and books that I was reading.  It also showed up when Lisa tagged me in the post about the One Word HyperDoc, inviting me to reconsider choosing a word for this year and encouraging my students to join me. I have decided to let go of my fear from last year, say “Yes!” to the word, “yes”, and claim that word for my own this year. I am choosing to believe that "yes" means that good things will come to me when I release fear, try new things, choose to shift perspective and see the underlying freedom in situations that might feel like they are currently burdening me, and receive opportunities that are sent my way. My fingers are crossed that this year my word takes me places that are far better than I ever could have imagined.

If you are struggling to choose a word, even after looking through the great resources, inspiration, and word lists, maybe you should consider making up your own word? My thoughtful father recently came across and shared with me a really incredible TEDx talk by John Koening called, “Beautiful New Words to Describe Obscure Emotions” which might inspire you to start generating words of your own. John is the author of The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows where he shares the words he has created to describe things that have previously eluded a single expression to define them.  He also has a YouTube channel where you can view all of the videos for the words he has carefully and thoughtfully crafted. The videos are absolutely, breathtakingly, poetically beautiful.  “Socha” made my breath catch.  “Sonder” touched my heart.  I have posted it below. Sonder means, “The realization that everyone has a story.”  What do you hope your story will look like in 2018? What word will you choose to represent it this year?

Have you chosen a word for 2018?

Have you tried doing a one word or vision boarding activity to start the new year with your students?

Do you have any other great activities that you like to use to start a new month, year, term, semester, or season in your classroom?

Please share in the comments below, or join our Facebook group and tell us your stories there!  Your voice and ideas are important and valued. 

Nothing Sticks Together If We Don't

This content is cross-posted from the EdTechTeam blog.

“Whatcha gonna do about it?” I felt like the Universe was taunting me with this question after a challenging series of difficult life events and unexpected changes in rapid succession.  In addition to feeling defeated and depleted on a personal level, I was feeling anxiety and concern about the world at large. Every time I turned on the news, scrolled through social media or perused trending topics, I was bombarded with stories that were steeped in negativity.  I needed help finding the positive, and looked for inspiration in books, podcasts, online courses, and videos from people who have worked through difficult times with great courage. I noticed that many of them had the same core message, expressed beautifully by Viktor Frankl:  “Forces beyond your control can take away everything you possess except one thing, your freedom to choose how you will respond to the situation.”  Perspective is powerful. Seeing difficult times as a catalyst for change and growth can help mitigate feelings of helplessness and hopelessness.  Instead of perceiving “Whatcha gonna do about it?” as a call to surrender to sadness and wave the white flag, I decided to choose to see it differently – as a challenge to do something good.  My response? The Glue EDU.

If we focus on the negative, we tend to see more of it. If we look for the positive, it begins to appear more frequently. I decided I wanted to create a blog that focused on the good, that helped myself, other teachers and students work toward becoming more “Wholehearted” (as defined by Brené Brown), and generate a positive ripple as a result.  

Sketchnote by  Leonie Dawson

Sketchnote by Leonie Dawson

I came up with my site’s mission: We appear to be existing in a time in this world (and often in educational systems) where the focus seems to be on things such as power, programs, policies, politics, plans, and procedures. It feels like decision makers sometimes overlook the most important “P word” of all: PEOPLEThe Glue EDU aspires to be a place where we can share lessons, activities, ideas, resources and more that help us work with our students to become human beings who are courageouscurious, and caring  – both to themselves and to others.  This could be through mindfulness activities, acts of service, global projects, storytelling, perspective shifting, and more!  Many of these activities can harness the power of technology to help us be even more effective and/or wide-reaching.

theglueEDU (5).png

As someone who has worked as a tech integrator for more than a decade, I am passionate about sharing ideas about using technology for GOOD, and teaching our students to do the same. I listen to a lot of people blame technology for many negative things in the world – that we are more connected to our devices but less connected to one another, just for starters.  In some instances, this may be true, but I believe we can work to shift our perspective here as well, and focus on all the positive ways we can use our tech tools. I have been incredibly fortunate to attend and present at many EdTechTeam Summits and events where I have seen this demonstrated over and over in presentations by other amazing educators. We can work with students to use technology to inspire curiosity, engage in empathetic interactions, and create, create, create – whether it’s connections to others, stories to share, solutions to problems, or moments of joy. It’s what you do with it that matters – and there are so many ways and opportunities to do it well!

It is scary to share your work publicly. When I began The Glue EDU, I worried that my only blog followers would be a couple good friends and my mom.  The response has been so much better than I ever expected. Colleagues in my own district are using some of the mindfulness resources I mentioned. Teachers from across North America, in New Zealand, and from Singapore, among others, shared how my post about #eyebombing brightened their day, made them smile, and inspired them to try it with their students. Kids in California are now getting a hug, handshake or high five from their teacher every day. An educator in Ohio reached out to say she made some big connections to the truthbombs I shared and thanked me for writing about them. Knowing that I am creating the positive ripple I had hoped for it gives me the courage to keep posting.

Human relationships, empathy, and compassion: they create the glue that connects us. I would love to hear your stories about using technology for good and possibly share them on the blog so others can hear them  – your perspective is important and necessary! Let’s use technology to connect our classrooms, share good ideas, and shift perspective to the positive together. Nothing sticks together if we don’t. Please join me!

Adobe Spark (6).jpg

A Catalog of Beauty

“I am not against critique, but the world’s need to nick pic everything is a dis-ease. What I crave is holiness. We are so far away from the heart, when only the head leads with only what is wrong. How about the million beauties you walked by today and did not see? Name them. The world needs/ I need your catalog of beauty. What is your catalog of beauty?”

- Glenis Redmond

I was excited to start the year with some photography projects. So were my fifth grade students.  They buzzed with questions and anticipation when they saw the kit of digital cameras arrive to our classroom from our district resource lending center, asking what I was planning for their use.  "I am so glad you are curious, " I responded happily and vaguely, much to their frustration. "I'm not telling yet. You'll find out soon".  I didn't make them wait too long. I was eager too.

Digital photography is a flexible medium that allows for a multitude of project options and opportunities for curricular integration. Photography is a great way to learn about elements of visual and graphic design, an amazing storytelling medium, and an incredible format for capturing thinking and learning in a visible way.  It's a great ladder into videography - another terrific format for developing creative muscles, and an excellent launchpad for discussion on digital citizenship and information privacy when talking about sharing work and peoples' likenesses online. Unlike my own early experiences with film-based cameras, the digital format is easy and inexpensive, there is no wait time to see what the photos turn out like, and you are not limited to 24 exposures on a single roll of film. It is easily accessible technology that almost anyone can learn to use successfully.

We started with a short lesson on some basics.  My friend, Nicole Dalesio, a talented educator and photographer from Los Altos, California, uses a great acronym that I shared with my students: SCARE. 

S - Simplify

C - Closer

A - Angle

R - Rule of Thirds

E - Even Lighting

I won't go into too much detail about what each of these terms mean in this post, but if you are interested, Stephen Davis gives a great description (and some nice project ideas) in this post from the CUE blog. We had some discussion around each of the above items, watched a few short, related YouTube videos to help with more in-depth understanding of the concepts, and then I let them loose on the school grounds to start snapping images. It was amazing to see what only 30 minutes of instruction around a few basic elements did to improve the quality of the photos they were taking. There was a high creativity factor, and everyone was excited and engaged. The students were proud of their work, and many expressed a wish to spend more time taking photos, or to at least plan another photo-taking activity for the future, when time constraints forced us to conclude our activity.

One valuable, and not often overtly recognized, gift of photography is that it can be an incredibly powerful way to be present and mindful, and to see things from a different perspective. My students were absolutely "in the moment" as they looked for beautiful and interesting things to take pictures of. They were willing to get on their backs or bellies and stand on top of objects to change their vantage point, and to see potential and art in the mundane things that we normally just walk past and take for granted. They were utterly and completely in the "now".  We had a good discussion about this upon returning to the classroom. I told them about how I have gone on photo walks during times when I am feeling stressed or worried - just me, my phone/camera, and my dog - in order to clear my head,  and stop lamenting about things that have happened in the past (which can lead to depression) or worrying about things that might happen in the future (which can lead to anxiety). Spending a small amount of time simply looking for beautiful moments to capture can be a very calming and effective mindfulness and gratitude practice. It always helps me feel better.  I encouraged them to try the same outside of school if they have the opportunity. 

As I was thinking about photography and the way it encourages us to be present in the moment, I was reminded of a passage from the talented poet, Glenis Redmond, that I have included at the beginning of this post.  I came across this quote on Rachel Macy Stafford's blog (which is a MUST read - so many beautiful stories that make you think and touch your heart) awhile back, and remembered it as I was thinking about writing this post. When I first read the verse, my breath caught - there was so much truth in these words. I felt happy when I recognized that my students and I were creating a catalog of beauty as we took our photos. We were noticing the "beauties" we normally walk by, and appreciating them fully, even if it was just for a small period of time. We were seeing with our hearts.  

I hope that we find more moments like this regularly throughout the year. Luckily there are other ways that we can continue this practice, even after we send the camera kit back to the lending library. We can use tablets, or webcams, or iPods, or phones. If I have even one camera that I can keep in the classroom, it can be requested for use by anyone who becomes aware of a moment of beauty that is just waiting to be noticed and captured into our shared catalog. We can use the same strategies without any technology simply by going on a walk and shaping our fingers into a rectangular "frame" and working hard to "develop" the image in our brains for future recall. This is a valuable practice to continue. The world needs more "beauties" to be collected and shared. We'll try to do our part.

I did not ask permission to use my students' photos in this post, so I have none that I am able to share, but I have been gleaning a lot of inspiration from amazing educator, Trevor Mattea, and his Twitter feed. He has been doing some great photography work with his students in the San Francisco area and posting them for others' enjoyment. Trevor has also shared some amazing and useful resources, such as his "Classroom Camera" slide deck, and a terrific playlist of helpful YouTube videos on photographic principles. Thank you, Trevor, for "showing your work" and sharing with others! It is such great stuff! 

Have you considered using photography as a way of appreciating the present moment?

Have you used photography projects in other creative ways in your classrooms?

Please share in the comments below, or join our Facebook group and tell us your stories there!

Adobe Spark.jpg

Just Three Deep Breaths

As humans, when we perceive that there is a threat of any kind, our brain tells our body to enter the "FFF" mode (Fight, Flight or Freeze). Adrenaline and cortisol are pumped through our system, our heart beats faster, our breathing rate accelerates, and muscles in our bodies tighten up, ready to react. A perceived threat can be anything from actual, imminent danger, to something as simple as thinking about something stressful. Human beings are the only animals that can activate the stress response even just by thinking about something that "could" happen - even if it's not really happening, or likely to happen at all. If our brain can think it, our body can react to it.

If our brain can make our bodies breathe faster as a response to stress, then it makes sense that if we calm our bodies with deep breathing, then our brain may take this as a signal that it is safe to relax. Even if we are not in a state of stress, a few deep breaths can help us quiet our minds for a moment, increase oxygen to our brains and bodies (which can improve energy, focus and attention), and help us start to develop a practice of mindfulness and being present in the moment.

Pausing to take even just three mindful breaths is a simple activity to integrate into the school day, and an easy practice to begin with your students.  This could be done in a "no tech" way by ringing a bell when it is time to take 3 breaths, or even by placing post-it notes or other prompts on desks, on books, or in other prominent locations where students will see them as a reminder to pause.

There are some excellent websites and tools that can help with this practice as well.  Xhalr.com is a simple, web-based tool that gives a visual to breathe along with. Under the menu at the top, right-hand side of the site, you can change settings to adjust the length of in/out breaths, along with types of breathing patterns.  Breathe With Me is another simple tool that offers a cute animal and soothing instrumental music to breathe along to.  One of my favourite tools is a Chrome Extension called "Breathe". This can be found in the Chrome web store and installed into your Chrome browser.  Once installed, you can click on the icon in your extension bar, and set the tool to pop up on your screen at regular intervals to prompt you to take a set number of breaths.  I am going to aim to have it pop up on the large screen or SMARTboard in my classroom every 30 minutes to remind the whole class to pause, be in the moment, and take 3 mindful breaths.

Have you tried doing mindful breathing activities with your students? Do you have any favourite tools that you would like to share? Please feel free to comment below this post, or join our Facebook group and share your ideas there!